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Bass Fishing Gurus is a comprehensive bass fishing site with tips, in-depth techniques, complete tackle including lures, weights, bobbers, hooks, reels and rods with lodge listings and fishing for kids. Over 500 pages of everything bass!

Macquaria novemaculeata - Australian Bass

Australian Bass

The Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata) is a member of the Percichthyidae family, unlike other named bass that are a member of the Centrarchidae family such as the Largemouth Bass, which is actually a member of the sunfish family and not at all related to the Australian Bass. However, the Australian Bass is in no way similar to the North American Smallmouth Bass or Largemouth Bass.

As it's name implies, the Australian Bass is native to Australia and can be found in the rivers and streams with access the ocean.

 

Popularity

Australian Bass are very popular among Australian anglers as it has many of the same traits that other bass have despite being moderate in size. Their fighting abilities make landing a four to six pound fish exciting and challenging.

However, for many, their fighting abilities are not the only reason to seek out the Australian Bass. They are well known for their flavour both in the home and on fishing expeditions.

As the scientific names indicate, the Australian Bass and estuary perch are the Macquaria genus, but this was not always the case. Prior to the 1970s, the Australian Bass and estuary perch were placed in a separate genus, Percalates.

 

Similarity to Estuary Perch

However, results from recent research, which used DNA analysis, provided solid evidence that the Australian Bass and estuary perch do actually belong in a separate genus to the golden perch and the Macquarie perch.

The research provided some other interesting facts about the Australian Bass. While currently a member of the Macquaria genus, it is genetically much closer to the cod species (Maccullochella).

So, are we ready to reclassify this fish again? Well, we think so and there is a good chance that they may be both put back into the Percalates genus. While uncommon, reclassification has occurred before and most likely will happen again with enough supporting evidence.

Currently, there is some disagreement over the classification over some Peacock Bass peacock bass, which are also not true bass as they are of the Cichla genus. However, as with the Australian Bass, the Peacock bass are known for their fighting abilities and the name has stuck.

 

Food Preferences

The Australian Bass eats fishes, crustaceans and other invertebrates such as insects and can also be caught with worms, both live and plastic. And in most cases, plastic worms offer more advantages over live bait as they do not expire, do not have to be kept at a particular temperature, can be reused and come in a large variety of shapes, sizes and colours.

While many claim that the Australian Bass can reach close to nine pounds, anglers are more likely to land a two pound fish, or even a one pound fish rather than an eight pounder.

 

Size

The largest Australian bass on record is recorded at 3.78 Kg (about 8.33 pounds). It is a rather large bass, growing to as much as 3.79 Kg (8.36 pounds), however, you are more likely to catch a two pounder.

As mentioned before, many of fish labelled as bass are actually members of are not true bass. And, other than the Peacock Bass, most of these fish are very similar in appearance and proportions, offer similar fighting traits and often chase after the same bait types.

 

Features

The Australian Bass is dark olive-green or greyish on the back and sides with darker scale margins. The belly is silvery or whitish, and the fins are mostly dusky brown to black. The tips of the anal and pelvic fins are white. Juvenile fish under 12cm long are banded and have a dark blotch on the gill cover.

The average length of the Australian Bass is just under 14 inches with the large lunkers reaching 24 inches in length. But again, most Australian Bass caught today are much closer to the 15 inch size.

The Australian Bass has an evenly arched dorsal profile, a snout that is straight or slightly concave and a forked caudal fin.

It has a protruding lower jaw with a moderately large eye and a notch between the spiny first dorsal fin and the soft-rayed second dorsal fin.

 

Distribution

While we will get into greater detail on their distribution in later sections, for now, know that the Australian Bass is found in coastal rivers, lakes and estuaries of eastern Australia from Fraser Island in the state of Queensland all the way to the Wilson's Promontory in the state of Victoria.

While other bass have been transplanted to other regions of the world, we were not able to find any research or news that found the Australian Bass anywhere other than what we listed above, with the exception of a few reservoirs in the state of Queensland.

If you come across the Australian Bass in other Australian states or other countries, please provide us with a picture and location. GPS coordinates are greatly appreciated.

Getting back to Australian, the Australian Bass can migrate considerable distances upstream and has been historically recorded up to an altitude of 600 metres in the Hawkesbury River drainage, New South Wales and can be caught with a wide range of tackle and lures, which we will get into in later sections found above.

In recent years, population sizes have declined as building of dams and weirs has made potential habitats inaccessible.

Australia has also encountered a significant draught that has effected the water level and volume of many inland rivers and streams.

River regulation is reported to interfere with spawning cues. In winter, adults migrate downstream to estuaries to breed.

There are many sport fishing clubs located on the east coast of Australia that provide support, tips and comradery where one can share stories about the one that got away. Bassfishing-Gurus.com tries to keep a record of all fishing clubs, if you come across one that is not listed, send it to us through out contact us page.

Features

The Australian Bass is coloured dark olive-green or greyish on the back and sides with darker scale margins. Looking down on the Australian Bass, it is very well camouflaged with the bottom rocks and mud with the shine off the water making it difficult to see them.

Their belly is silvery or whitish and the fins are mostly dusky brown to black while the tips of the anal and pelvic fins are white. However, juvenile fish have a different colour pattern. Those that are under 12cm (4.7 inches) long are banded and have a dark blotch on the gill cover. This is of course lost as they age or grow past 12cm long.

The pectoral fin appears thicker than most fish, but gives it better control in the water to move quickly while maintaining stability.

The Australian Bass has an evenly arched dorsal profile, a snout that is straight or slightly concave and a forked caudal fin. It has a protruding lower jaw with a moderately large eye and a notch between the spiny first dorsal fin and the soft-rayed second dorsal fin. Like many bass, this top of the dorsal fin contains strong, sharp spines and should be handled carefully.

The tail is thick and short, quickly expanding into a large crescent-shaped caudal fin. The Australian Bass has a strong tail, which gives it the ability to sprint through the water. This sprinting ability allows it to launch from under cover and quickly attack its prey. The Australian Bass is strong and built for speed and stealth.

 

Preferred Distribution

While the Australian Bass can be found in estuaries, they prefer to stay in areas that provide cover and avoid the open areas, though tend to venture out more at night as they are primarily a night fish. In fact, it is much more active in the early hours of the morning just before dawn as the sun starts to rise to several hours afterwards.

However, the Australian Bass is found in coastal rivers though out most of the year other than the winter months when it is found spawning in estuaries.

While they cam be found in lakes and reservoirs behind dams, they are most often introduced to these areas as they cannot sustain themselves in waterways that do not offer access to the ocean to spawn.

Australian Bass have a limited natural distribution on the south-east side of Australia. While they have been introduced to lakes and reservoirs, these are limited to Australian waterways and have not been introduced to waterways outside of Australia.

Australian Bass can migrate considerable distances upstream and have been historically recorded up to an altitude of 600m (approximately 1980 feet) in the Hawkesbury River drainage, New South Wales.

 

Size

The Australian Bass is a ferocious fighting fish and while it can grow to a record 3.78Kg (8.3 pounds), most fish range between the one to two pound range with most of them being closer to the one pound range.

We have come across some sites that claim record sizes reaching up to 18 pounds (8.2 Kg). However, we could not find a single authoritive site claiming anything over the high eight pound range. What we feel has happened in some cases is that the Australian Bass has been mistaken for another fish genus.

BassFisging-Gurus.com went looking through records to find the largest Australian Bass ever caught. The largest all-tackle record is 3.78 kilograms or about 8.33 pounds, far lower than the largest claimed bass ever caught.

As mentioned above, the longest one ever caught was 24 inches long. Most of the one to two pound Australian Bass caught are between twelve inches to fourteen inches long.

 

Record Size

The record Australian Bass was caught with a eight to 12 pound test using a 70cm trace, a number 2 2/0 hook and a light baitcaster with a lightball running sinker. Using spinning gear also works as does trolling.

Provided courtesy of bassfishing-gurus.com

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